February 11, 2015

Question:
What are the potential risks and side effects that come with the ICL procedure?

Answer:
Most common risks/side effects of the ICL procedure include accuracy issues (slight nearsightedness or farsightedness following the procedure), night glare and halos, and dry eyes. Even so, these risks are small.

More rare risks include glaucoma, inflammation inside the eye, cataract, retinal detachment, and infection inside the eye.

 

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February 11, 2015

Question:
It has been 7 months since my operation, I still have dry eyes and blurry vision. Is this an issue to address with my Doctor? Or will it heal over time?

Answer:
Understand that if your eyes were dry before surgery, they will always be dry. I’m assuming they are now drier than they were. Although it can take a year or more for dryness to resolve following surgery (you don’t say whether you had LASIK or PRK), at 7 months typically it has resolved for most patients. PRK has a lower risk of permanent dryness than does LASIK. I would recommend discussing this with your doctor. In the interim, while you are waiting (and hoping) for it to improve, there are several things you can do to help the dryness. Artificial tears, nighttime lubricating ointments, Restasis prescription eyedrops, and punctum plugs are all very helpful at treating post-surgical dryness.
As far as the blurry vision, it may be from the dryness, or it may be unrelated. A consultation with your surgeon can easily determine the cause and how to address it.

 

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June 10, 2011

Mechanical engineering Assistant Professor Adela Ben-Yakar at The University of Texas at Austin has developed a laser “microscalpel” that destroys a single cell while leaving nearby cells intact, which could improve the precision of surgeries for cancer, epilepsy and other diseases.

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June 10, 2011

A compact fiber-optic probe developed for the space program has now proven valuable for patients in the clinic as the first non-invasive early detection device for cataracts, the leading cause of vision loss worldwide.

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June 10, 2011

Stem cells collected from human corneas restore transparency and don’t trigger a rejection response when injected into eyes that are scarred and hazy, according to experiments conducted in mice by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

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